Students, Teachers Disagree on E-Hallpass

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Students, Teachers Disagree on E-Hallpass

Sean Sorek, Staff Writer

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E-Hallpass, a pass management system, was implemented by the school this year to solve many problems, varying from safety to vaping. 

 

According to the Eduspire Solutions, the company responsible for E-Hallpass, the service allows schools to “know how many students are in the hall at any time with real-time updates on student arrivals,” and “see reports of hall time and traffic for any given period.”

 

The system has been met with skepticism so far, but the administration is praising its accountability features. 

 

“It’s early data, but we can use it to discipline more effectively,” Principal Timothy Flynn said. “Seventy percent of discipline referrals deal with attendance.”

 

The program also has plenty of safety and security benefits, as demonstrated in the recent ERP drill.

 

“We managed to have everyone found in 25 minutes,” Principal Flynn said. “Do you know how good that is?”

 

While E-Hallpass does have its benefits, many students do not think the pros outweigh the cons. In a recent poll conducted by the Bulldog Tribune, 81% of students believe that E-Hallpass is less effective than the old system, including senior Garrett Stebbins.

 

“Signing in and out of class disrupts the lesson more than asking for a paper pass,” Stebbins said. 

 

Many students, including senior Maddie Brown, agree that it takes too much time and is distracting.

 

“It takes more time out of instruction to create a pass and for the teacher to approve it,” Brown said.

 

Despite student perception, many teachers, like social studies teacher William Wilkin, appreciate the peace of mind E-Hallpass provides during emergencies and evacuations.

 

“As an Army guy, I’m always worried about my students during emergencies,” Mr. Wilkin said. “We always know where everyone is.”

 

Besides safety, the convenience for teachers is also a useful feature, Mr. Wilkin continues.

 

“If I request a student for a retake or a make-up, it notifies everyone involved,” Mr. Wilkin said. “No more playing tag.”